Acupuncture Works

A Natural Way of Healing


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Home remedies for Flu/Cold season

Ginger (Sheng Jiang) and Green onion (Cong Bai) Tea

When you just begin to feel the onset of cold or flu especially with chill, sneeze and/or running nose, this ancient remedy is a wonderful easy to sip to treat and prevent symptoms from getting worse. Green onion is an excellent source of vitamin C and K, and a very good source of vitamin A as well. The benefits of ginger and green onion tea are induces light sweating, warms the lungs, alleviates nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain, strengthens immunity, and reduces phlegm. 

The dosage is flexible. I usually use 15g of ginger, 2 sticks of green onion and 3-4 cups water bring to boil, and simmer for 5 minutes. You may add a tea spoon of honey to the tea if you feel itching or dry of your throat. Please note, if you have been sick for a few days, then this is not the herb formula.

Asian Pears

Asian pears are well known in China as cough remedy for centuries. They are in nature of cold, high in Vitamin C and K, and low in fat and cholesterol. You can eat it as raw with skin peeled off, or if you begin to cough, you can cook it with a spoonful of honey. We all know honey is very effective against infections. You will need to 1. Wash the pear and cut the top of the pear and make a lid,  Core out the middle then pour honey into the hole; 3. Cover the lid; 4. Bring it to steam for 20 minutes. 5. Ready to eat, and drink the pear juice with honey. If you don’t find Asian pears, other pears can be used.

However, this remedy will soothe your throat and may reduce your coughing, but it will not cure. If coughing persists, you will need to contact your primary doctor and/or getting acupuncture and herbal treatments.

Chicken soup

Chicken soup is my favorite home healing remedy, as everyone knows the healing power of  chicken soup. You can cook with a whole chicken, chicken breast or chicken thighs. I usually like to add a few slices of ginger, some cooking wine, and oyster mushrooms. It’s flexible to add whatever your favorites, most common ones are carrots and celery. If you don’t have chicken to cook, store bought organic chicken broth is always a good alternative. When you are sick, drink more chicken soup than warm water will be possible helpful from getting worse. Cabbage, tomato and potato cook with chicken soup is one of our family’s favorite Winter soups.

 

 


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Curb your food cravings with Acupuncture

It’s a challenge to eat healthy when there is junk food readily available. It only takes a single glimpse or thought of a sweet treat or salty, savory snack for a ravenous craving to kick in.

Over time, these binges, if not controlled, can lead to weight gain, fatigue, muddled thinking, and moodiness, to name a few.

A balanced meal, according to according acupuncture and Oriental medicine, consists of foods that represent all five tastes—sweet, sour, bitter, salty, pungent. Each taste corresponds with a specific organ channel. By understanding their connection, you can move toward maintaining a healthy appetite.

The five tastes are:

Pungent
Associated with the Lung and Large Intestine pungent tastes include the dry, hot taste found in garlic, ginger, and onions needed to help the lungs properly circulate energy throughout the whole body.

Sweet
Sweet tastes are associated with the stomach and spleen. Fruits, sweet potatoes, and some vegetables like carrots aid in digestion and reduce the toxicity of all foods.

Sour
Liver and Gall Bladder are associated with sour tastes. Sour foods, like pickles or vinegar, help your body metabolize fats better.

Bitter
The bitter taste found in dark chocolate, radish, and bitter gourd removes excess heat from the Heart and Small Intestine helping them function better and pacify negative emotions.

Salty
The salty taste associated with the Kidney and Bladder has a big impact on moistening hard bowels and regulating their movements.

Curbing your cravings takes knowing which system is out of whack. If there is an intense hankering for sweet and salty, this implicates the Spleen, Stomach, Kidney, and Urinary Bladder. The desire for rich, fatty foods can be traced back to the Liver and Gall Bladder.

Since the Spleen and Stomach are associated with obsession, which can certainly be the case in an inability to restrain oneself from devouring all cookies and chips in the kitchen, these are usually the culprit behind every craving. An acupuncture treatment typically includes points to help bolster a sluggish Spleen and other lagging organs.


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Top 5 Nutrients to Boost Men’s Health

nutrients pic

Men have different nutritional requirements than women, due to their unique physiology. These are the five key nutrients for men’s health to keep in mind when planning that next meal.

Magnesium
Magnesium plays a key role in many important bodily functions, including the immune system, energy production, digestion and nerve and muscle activity. A man lacking in magnesium may experience painful muscle spasms and cramps, anxiety, lethargy, or an irregular heartbeat. To stave off these symptoms of magnesium deficiency incorporate dark leafy vegetables, yogurt, bananas, black beans or almonds into your daily diet.

Another way your body can absorb magnesium is through a soothing foot bath or a soak in the tub with Epsom salt. The magnesium sulfate in Epsom salt will penetrate through the skin as you relax. A couple tablespoons are all that is required for a foot bath, and about a cup is recommended for the bathtub.

Vitamin D
Vitamin D is sometimes referred to as the ‘sunshine vitamin’ because the skin produces it when it is exposed to sunlight. Vitamin D assists the body in absorbing calcium, which in turn contributes to strong teeth and bones. This nutrient also provides some protection against cancer. Foods high in Vitamin D include fatty fish, such as tuna or salmon, cheese, and mushrooms

Vitamin B12
This versatile vitamin is responsible for red blood cell production, DNA production, bone health and maintaining the cardiovascular system. It is necessary for certain neurological functions and contributes to an overall sense of well-being. Foods high in Vitamin B12 include shellfish, red meat, cheese, eggs, yogurt and milk.

There are no plant-based options rich in B12, so those on a vegan diet may want to consider adding fortified cereals, nutritional yeast or supplements in order to reach their daily requirements of vitamin B12.

Potassium
This nutrient serves many vital functions to keep the body healthy and strong. It delivers nourishment into the cells and removes toxins and waste products from them. Potassium also maintains the balance between the fluids and electrolytes in the body and is responsible for nerve health and muscle contraction. A lack of potassium can cause a host of symptoms including nausea, muscle cramping and heart palpitations. Potassium-rich foods include dark leafy greens, potatoes (with the skin on), squash, yogurt, bananas, white beans, and mushrooms.

Iodine
Iodine is a trace mineral that helps convert food into energy. It also plays a significant role in thyroid health and has the job of producing thyroid hormones. Consuming inadequate amounts of iodine can cause memory problems, weight gain, muscle fatigue, persistent tiredness and feeling cold.
Foods with plenty of iodine in them include kelp, hiziki, kombu, yogurt, seafood (such as cod, sea bass and haddock), cheese, potatoes, navy beans, cranberries and strawberries.